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Green Hill HOA -- Land Use Appeal

Saturday, April 07, 2012 8:21 PM
Subject: Greenhill Homeowners Association Land Use Appeal

On Friday, the developer (Traditions Development Corp.) withdrew their second Petition to require us to post a bond. Now that the petition has been withdrawn, the appeal will be considered by the next higher level court, in this case the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania. Our brief is due on 4/30 and Traditions' brief is due 30 days after that. The Court will schedule a hearing after that.

As of March 30, 2012, I have been admitted pro hac vice to the bar of Pennsylvania and am now serving as co-counsel for the Homeowners Association. Under the pro hac vice procedure, I am allowed to represent the Homeowners Association in this paticular case only, thru a sponsoring attorney admitted to the bar of PA.

Thanks for your continued interest in this matter.


West Goshen approves supervisor referendum

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

By ANNE PICKERING

Staff Writer

WEST GOSHEN -- Voters approved a referendum to add two more supervisors to the three-member Board of Supervisors.

With all nine precincts reporting, 4,138 votes were cast in favor of the referendum and 3,358 votes were cast against it.

All results are unofficial until certified by the county's Board of Elections.

Township resident Philip Corvo, who spearheaded the referendum, said he was pleased with the victory.

"It was the result of a lot of people's efforts in the last six months. We had strong support from both the Democratic and Republican parties," Corvo said.

Poll workers at the Government Services Building in West Goshen, where two precincts are located, said voting turnout was good considering it was not a presidential election.

Curt Eldredge said he voted against the referendum.

"I really didn't know much about it, but I voted 'no' because I'm for keeping the township lean and mean," said Eldredge

Another resident, Fred Bissetti, said he voted for it.

"I voted for it. It can't hurt," said Bissetti.

The measure is the brainchild of Corvo, who says the current board is unresponsive to the needs of residents.

Corvo and his supporters ran a petition campaign in the summer to get the referendum on the ballot. While Corvo collected 841 signatures, 142 of them were challenged.

Common Pleas Judge James P. MacElree III ruled that 730 signatures were valid and the referendum could go forward.

Eventually, both the West Goshen Republican Committee and the West Goshen Democratic Committee endorsed the referendum.

West Goshen Supervisor Robert White in September said he would support the measure as well.

If voters pass the referendum, there will be three seats up for election in the May primary, including the seat of current Supervisors Chairman Edward Meakim Jr.

Each supervisor serves a six-year term and Meakim's current term expires at the end of 2011. He has not said whether he plans to seek reelection.

The number of supervisors in townships varies, typically at three or five. Tredyffrin, the largest municipality in Chester County, has seven.

To contact staff writer Anne Pickering, send an e-mail to apickering@dailylocal.com


Source

West Goshen Republicans support ballot referendum

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

By DAN KRISTIE, Staff Writer

WEST GOSHEN — The West Goshen Republican Committee has thrown its support behind a November ballot referendum that will ask voters whether two supervisors should be added to the township's three-member board.

This comes less than a month after Common Pleas Judge James P. MacElree II struck down a challenge that nearly killed the referendum. The challenge had been filed with the help of Joel Frank, a prominent member of the Chester County Republican Committee.

West Goshen Republican Committee Chairman Shannon Royer said that his committee, after 45 minutes of discussion, voted unanimously to support the referendum.

"It was clear that the committee people felt adding two supervisors would be helpful to the township," Royer said. He added that his committee members believe it is desirable to add two new supervisors, given the township's recent population growth.

Royer said he does not believe the November referendum is a partisan issue.

"A lot of Republicans in our township signed the petition," Royer said. "It seems to me from all the discussion taking place … that it has a lot of Republican support as well as Democratic support."

Ed Finegan, the chairman of the West Goshen Democratic Committee, said that his committee has not yet voted on whether to support the petition.

"I support it personally," Finegan said. "We haven't put it to the West Goshen rank and file yet … we will at this Wednesday's meeting."

West Goshen Supervisor Robert White, who formerly opposed adding two supervisors, said Monday that he will no longer oppose the petition.

"I thought it out, and if the residents of West Goshen want five supervisors, they get five," White said. "If they want three, they keep three. That's all I've got to say."

Township resident Phillip Corvo, who owns a plastic recycling business, is behind the referendum. Earlier this year, he began circulating a petition asking voters whether the supervisors question should appear on the November ballot.

He collected 841 signatures, but township resident Jay McDonough, an air traffic controller, challenged 142 of them.

MacElree ruled Aug. 16 that 730 of the signatures were valid. If he had found less than 728 were valid, the referendum would have died.

McDonough testified before MacElree that he learned of the petition from his neighbor Joel Frank, who serves on the county Republican committee's executive board. Attorney Mark Thompson represented McDonough. Thompson is an associate at the West Chester Law Firm Lamb McErlane, where Frank is a managing partner.

All three West Goshen supervisors are Republicans. The township solicitor is Joseph "Skip" Brion, who serves as chairman of the Chester County Republican Committee.

Corvo is a registered Democrat whose son, Brian Corvo, sits on the West Goshen Democratic Committee.

Corvo said that he does not view the referendum as a partisan issue. He said he and other township residents, from both parties, have found the current supervisors unresponsive to the needs of residents.

"I've always argued that it's a nonpartisan initiative," Corvo said. "If the referendum passes and two more seats are created, it will become a very partisan issue."

If the referendum petition passes, voters will be asked in the following election who the two new supervisors should be.

To contact staff writer Dan Kristie, send an e-mail to dkristie@dailylocal.com.

Source

Judge strikes down challenge to petition

Thursday, August 19, 2010
By DAN KRISTIE

WEST GOSHEN — Township voters will decide this November whether the board of supervisors should expand from three to five seats.

Common Pleas Judge James P. MacElree II on Monday struck down a challenge to a referendum petition asking this question be placed on the Nov. 2 ballot.

The petition contained 841 signatures. In order to succeed, 728 of those signatures needed to be valid.

MacElree ruled that 730 were valid.

The leader of the petition drive was township resident Phillip Corvo, who owns a plastic recycling business. He, along with several other residents, spent the summer going door-to-door collecting signatures.

Corvo's argument has been that the three current supervisors are unresponsive to the needs of township residents and do not spend taxpayer money judiciously.

Corvo said that because the current supervisors serve six-year terms, with one coming up for election every two years, it is difficult for voters to change the makeup of the board. Adding two seats, he said, would increase the likelihood residents find a sympathetic ear among the supervisors.

Supervisor Robert White, who opposes adding two seats to the board, said Wednesday that he hasn't decided whether he will urge voters to vote down the referendum.

"I still feel the three of us are doing a good job," White said. "I don't really feel we need five supervisors. That's my opinion."

Corvo said he will now craft a campaign urging voters to vote yes on the referendum.

"I made a commitment to people that I would see this through to Nov. 2," Corvo said.

Corvo submitted the petition to voter services in early August. On Aug. 10, the last day to challenge the petition, township resident Jay McDonough filed a challenge.

McDonough, an air traffic controller, argued that the petition contained fewer than 700 valid signatures.

On Aug. 12, Judge MacElree held a hearing on the petition challenge. Attorney Mark Thompson, who represented McDonough, argued that 127 of the signatures Corvo submitted were defective, either because the signatories were not registered to vote in West Goshen or because they made errors when signing.

Thompson, of the West Chester firm Lamb McErlane, also argued that a one-page amendment Corvo made to the petition was invalid. The amendment contained 14 signatures and raised the total number of signatures from 827 to 841. Corvo submitted the amendment on Aug. 3, the deadline to file.

At the hearing, Chester County Voter Services Director Jim Forsythe testified that 110 of the signatures on the original petition were defective. But he said there was nothing to suggest the other 17 signatures McDonough challenged were invalid.

Those 17 signatures were out of sequence, which means that the dates next to the signatures fell before the dates next to the signatures that appeared above them on the petition.

In his Monday ruling, MacElree wrote that while 110 of the signatures on the original petition were invalid, the 17 out-of-sequence signatures were valid.

MacElree also accepted the one-page, 14-signature amendment Corvo filed on Aug. 3.

Thompson had argued on Aug. 12 that because the amendment did not contain a page number and was not attached to the first 66 pages of the petition, it was not part of the petition.

Thompson had also argued that the state law required all pages of the petition be registered with the West Goshen secretary. While the first 66 pages of the petition were registered, the 67th was not.

MacElree, however, ruled that referendum petitions such as Corvo's do not need to be registered with a township secretary — they only need to be submitted to voter services along with the sworn affidavits of those who circulated them.

MacElree also ruled that case law supports accepting amendments made after the initial petition is filed, so long as the amendments are filed by deadline.

McDonough testified at the Aug. 12 hearing that he learned of the petition drive from his neighbor, Joel Frank. Frank is a managing partner at Lamb McErlane, where Thompson is an associate.

Frank is also on the executive committee of the Chester County Republican Committee. West Goshen's solicitor, Joseph E. "Skip" Brion, is chairman of the county Republican committee. All three of West Goshen's supervisors are Republicans.

Frank said Wednesday that there is no connection between the county Republican committee and McDonough's challenge to Corvo's petition. The three West Goshen supervisors, White, Patricia McIlvaine and Edward Meakim, said they do not know McDonough.

McDonough told MacElree on Thursday that he challenged the petition because he does not believe it is a good idea to expand the size of government.

Corvo, a registered Democrat, said Wednesday that the petition drive has nothing to do with partisan politics.

"This is about whether you are getting value for your tax dollars — about whether you are getting proper representation," Corvo said.


Source

Resident challenges petition signatures

Friday, August 13, 2010

By DAN KRISTIE and MICHAEL P. RELLAHAN, Staff Writers

WEST GOSHEN — An effort to add two more supervisors to the township's three-member board is in jeopardy.

Township resident Jay McDonough, an air traffic controller, has filed a challenge that could prevent a November voter referendum on whether the township board should expand.

During a four-hour hearing held Thursday before Common Pleas Judge James P. McElree III, McDonough challenged 131 of the 826 signatures that appear on the petition. If McElree rejects those signatures, the petition will fall 33 signatures short of the number required for a referendum.

Township resident Phillip Corvo, who owns a plastic recycling business, filed the referendum petition with Chester County Voter Services on Aug. 2. Corvo said he filed the petition because he believes the West Goshen supervisors are secretive and ignore the requests of township residents.

Corvo, a registered Democrat, said residents would be more likely to find a sympathetic ear on the board if two supervisors were added. Corvo said because the three supervisors serve six-year terms, with one running for re-election every two years, it is hard for voters to change the makeup of the board.

McDonough, a registered Republican, said he challenged Corvo's petition because he does not believe in expanding the size of government.

"I am just very anti-big government, whether it is at the federal level, the state level or the local level," McDonough told Judge MacElree. "I don't want more red tape or bureaucracy."

McDonough is represented by attorney Mark P. Thompson, of the West Chester law firm Lamb McErlane. McDonough said he learned of the petition from his neighbor Joel Frank, who is a managing partner at Lamb McErlane.

Frank is also an assistant solicitor with the Chester County Republican Committee. Joseph E. "Skip" Brion, the chairman of the county Republican committee, is West Goshen's solicitor. All three of West Goshen's supervisors are Republicans.

Brion attended part of the Thursday hearing and told McElree the township takes no position on the petition.

Frank said during an interview on Wednesday there is no Republican Party effort to kill the petition.

"I don't think there is a Republican Party connection," Frank said.

West Goshen's supervisors said Wednesday they do not know McDonough and did not learn of his challenge to the petition until after it had been filed.

"All I know is he's a West Goshen resident," said Chairwoman Patricia McIlvaine. Supervisors Robert White and Ed Meakim also said they did not know him.

White said earlier this year that he opposed expanding the board. He said the three current supervisors work efficiently. Adding more supervisors, he said, could complicate the task of governing the township.

Corvo appeared before Judge MacElree without an attorney Thursday morning. He said Wednesday that he had just learned of the challenge and intended to ask MacElree for a continuance so that he could obtain an attorney. On Thursday, MacElree, citing time constraints, declined Corvo's request. By law, Judge MacElree must render a decision by Aug. 18.

The question for MacElree to decide is whether Corvo collected enough qualified signatures to file the petition. State law requires that a municipal referendum be supported by a petition of at least 5 percent of the voters in a municipality, or in the case of West Goshen, 728 voters.

Thompson said that of the 826 signatures filed in Corvo's original 66-page petition, 127 signatures came from people who were either not registered at all, not registered in West Goshen, gave their wrong name or wrong address, used ditto marks in their signatures, or had dates of their signatures out of order on the petition.

An additional page of the petition contained 14 more signatures, but Thompson told MacElree he objected to the inclusion of that page in the final tally because it had not been attached to the full petition and had not been filed with the township, as is required by law.

Corvo objected to the challenge that the names of many signers were invalid because of wrong addresses. He said the signers were using their mailing addresses instead of their actual residential addresses. For example, several used as their addresses their apartment numbers at Goshen Commons, a large complex on East Marshall Street.

James Forsyth, the director of the Chester County Office of Voters Services, testified that the registration listing of people residing at Goshen Commons is actually 750 E. Marshall St.. He said they should have listed that address on the petition.

MacElree cited a state Supreme Court ruling that holds that only under extraordinary circumstances - such as being displaced by a fire or other calamity — can a person not use their registered address on a petition.

The judge did take issue with Thompson's challenge of the order of the dates listed next to the signatures on the petition. Some signers listed dates that came before the date of the person who signed on the line above them.

Thompson suggested that this indicated fraud. However, Thompson said he had no case law which said such "out of order" dates are invalid. Corvo maintained that the signers could have made innocent mistakes in listing the wrong date next to their signatures.

Corvo repeatedly told MacElree he could not effectively respond to Thompson's evidence because he was not an attorney and had not had time to engage one.

"I'm looking at this evidence for the very first time today," he said.

MacElree said he was under strict time constraints to hold a hearing and come to a decision.

Corvo told a reporter after the hearing that if he loses, he would appeal the case "as far as it has to go."

"The petition stands on its own merit," he said. He said he had no experience circulating petitions such as this and was doing so without assistance of veteran politicians.

"It was done in good faith by a number of good persons," Corvo said. "And ultimately, the resolution of this is going to be at the voting booth."


Source

West Goshen not happy with the petition

Mon, August 2, 2010 4:45:20 PM

From: wgpetitiondrive@gmail.com
Sent: Mon, August 2, 2010 4:45:20 PM
Subject: Petition Submission

Petition Submission We submitted the petition to Chester County Voter Services this afternoon. Along with a last minute amendment, we submitted 67 pages with 841 signatures. The legal minimum was 728 signatures which give us a 113 signature margin or 15%. The people at voter services said they would have to check signatures and put a legal notice in the newspaper. I will check back with them in the next several days and see how they are progressing.

We had a little bit more drama at the township. We asked for Mr. LaLonde and he was not in, nor was Ms. Turley. We told the receptionist that we were only delivering the petition and someone would have to sign for it. No one wanted to do so. I suggested that they call the township solicitor. They were not available. Finally, Mr. Brion called the township and told them to accept the document. Mr. Craig, the township engineer, eventually signed for it but was not happy doing so.

I will keep you updated on the next steps.

Best regards,

Phil


Phil Corvo Reports Success!

Sun, July 25, 2010

Petition Summary 7-25

From: Philip Corvo

I want to congratulate everyone for having achieved the first threshold of this petition drive. As of today, we have a total of 733 signatures. The legal minimum requirement is 728 names.

We now need to begin building the insurance coverage needed to protect the petition from any objections that voter services or the township might raise.

I have proposed the minimum of names we need is 800 names or another 67 names. More will be better.

I was out this past Saturday and Sunday and I was surprised by the number of people who have now heard about our efforts. We are succeeding at getting the message out.

Best regards,

Phil



2 more supervisors for West Goshen isn't such a bad idea

June 23, 2010

We greet with enthusiasm the news that some residents in West Goshen believe that the present Board of Supervisors be expanded to add two new positions. The more the merrier, we say, but more to the point, the more supervisors the more that there is a chance that open government will flourish in Chester County's second most populated township.

For years, the current board - made up of Dr. Robert S. White, Patricia B. McIlvaine, and Edward G. Meakim Jr. - have treated township residents as afterthoughts. They discuss little in public and do so at a time - in the middle of the afternoon - when most residents cannot attend their meetings.

Requests to open up their sessions to evening hours have been met with distain. Their stubborness seems to filter down to almost all levels of the township hierarchy, from the police department to the parks department. The former township manager, Sharon Lynn, with whom the board is now locked in a battle over retirement pay, made it a habit of not discussing the public's business with the public.

Now, resident Phillip Corvo is circulating a petition that would place a referendum on the November ballot asking voters if the township should add two more supervisors to its three-member board. And if the referendum passes, township voters would select those new supervisors in the following election.

Corvo said he is undertaking this effort because the three sitting supervisors are unresponsive to township residents. While canvassing door to door with his petition, Corvo said, many residents have agreed with his assessment and told him about issues they feel township government has inadequately addressed.

"It's as if there's a wall; don't even contemplate crossing it," Corvo said, describing the attitude he says township supervisors exhibit.

As evidence of this, attempts to reach supervisors and discuss the matter with them were met generally with stony silence from all but White, the board's chairman. Not surprisingly, White thought little of the idea, and defended the current board's behavior.

"(Corvo) can do whatever he wants; my bottom line is I'm opposed to having five supervisors," White said. "I just don't see the need for it."

Corvo needs about 600 signatures to get the referendum on the November ballot. He said he has half that many already. But he said in the event the legitimacy of some of the signatures is challenged, he plans to collect more than he needs.

"I'm going to keep getting signatures until time runs out," Corvo said.

We hope that he gets the job done, and urge voters to sign the petition.


Source
More about Phil Corvo in the DLN

Also see recent documents in the Document Archives page.


Traditions Development Corporation-Apartments

------> April 16, 2010 -- The Board of Supervisors said it would render its decision in 45 days. (May 12-approved-that was a quick 45 days, no?) <------

Jump to:

Letters to East Goshen residentsEast Goshen's online announcementPhotosDLN ArticleEast Boot Road widening project
Document Archives

The latest development:

Traditions plan moves forward

May 13, 2010
By DAN KRISTIE, Staff Writer

WEST GOSHEN — The supervisors voted 2-1 Wednesday to grant conditional-use approval for a proposal to build a 35-foot-tall, 115-unit senior living facility next to the Goshen Fire Company on Boot Road.

After more than nine months of dispute with the fire company and nearby residents, Traditions LLC, a provider of independent living facilities for seniors, is now one step closer to building the facility.

There are still several more layers of approval the Traditions proposal will have to pass through, and there is no clear indication when construction will start.

Supervisor Robert White, who voted in favor of the proposal, said he believes the Traditions development will help provide needed housing for seniors.

"I think it's a good use of the property, and I think it's something our senior citizens can use," White said. "It's not real affordable, but it's affordable, and I think it will be a credit for West Goshen and the county — we do need housing for seniors."

But Supervisor Patricia McIlvaine, who voted against the proposal, said that while she has nothing against Traditions, she believes the company could have chosen a better place to build.

"I just think it's not a good location for a building its size," McIlvaine said. "It's a very busy corner, and I don't think it should be next to a firehouse."

Traditions in 2007 entered into an agreement of sale to purchase the 6.6-acre parcel located at Boot and Greenhill roads, next to the Goshen Fire Company and near the northbound ramp to Route 202.

The parcel was originally zoned R-1, which means only 12 homes could have been built on it. But the supervisors, in response to a request from Traditions, changed the zoning to R-3, a district type that permits independent living facilities to be built on parcels of five or more acres.

The Goshen Fire Company and East Goshen Township, which were parties to the nine-month conditional-use hearing, voiced opposition to the Traditions development.

The fire company expressed concern that those who live at and visit the Traditions facility might get in the way of emergency vehicles — because of right-of-way agreements, the same driveways that give access to Station 56 of the fire company give access to the Traditions parcel.

Also opposed to the development was the Greenhill Homeowners' Association, which represents residents who live on Culbertson and Eastwick circles, near the site of the proposed development. The homeowners' association echoed the public safety concerns raised by the fire company.

To address these concerns, the supervisors imposed a number of conditions on Traditions. Among them are that Traditions must make a number of traffic improvements to portions of Greenhill and Boot roads near the development and must install a warning system to keep Traditions residents and visitors from blocking fire company vehicles that are going out on emergency calls.

The testimony portion of the conditional-use hearing closed on April 14. The supervisors on Wednesday fielded a few questions about the development and then rendered their decision.

Staff writer Anne Pickering contributed reporting.

To contact staff writer Dan Kristie, send an e-mail to dkristie@dailylocal.com.


Source

Traditions gets conditional use approval

May 12, 2010

WEST GOSHEN - The supervisors voted 2 to 1 on Wednesday to grant conditional use approval to a proposal to build a 115-unit senior living facility next to the Goshen Fire Company on Boot Road.

After more than nine months of battle with the fire company and nearby residents, Traditions Development Corp., a provider of independent living facilities for seniors, is one step closer to building the facility.

There are still several more layers of approval Traditions will have to pass through, and there is no clear indication of when construction will start.

For the full story, see the May 13 edition of the Daily Local News.


Source

Testimony ends in hearing for planned senior living facility

April 16, 2010
By ANNE PICKERING, Staff Writer

WEST GOSHEN — Testimony was concluded Wednesday in the conditional-use hearing for Traditions, a controversial senior living facility being proposed to be built next to the Goshen Fire Company on Boot Road.

In the last day of testimony, the Greenhill Homeowners Association presented exhibits to the board including a petition signed by 1,100 residents from six townships opposed to the development because it may affect the operations of the fire department.

The Greenhill Homeowners Association represents residents from 27 homes on Culbertson and Eastwick circles who live adjacent to the proposed development, right over the township line in East Goshen.

The Board of Supervisors said it would render its decision in 45 days.

Throughout the nine-month hearing, testimony has been heard from the applicant, Traditions, and parties to the proceeding including East Goshen Township, the Goshen Fire Company and the HOA.

Traditions, a provider of independent living facilities for seniors, wants to construct a 35-foot-tall building that would house 114 units plus a manager's unit on the 6.6-acre parcel. Residents and visitors to the facility would share the driveways with Station 56 of the Goshen Fire Company, raising concerns that emergency responders rushing to the facility may be slowed by other people using the driveways.

Both the fire company and East Goshen went on the record as being opposed to the facility in principle but did agree to a list of 28 conditions proposed by the developer.

At the outset of the hearing and to allay any concerns about a conflict of interest, township solicitor Kristin Camp revealed that the law firm where she works had represented the Janiec family in the past.

"I had disclosed this before but it had not appeared in the record," Camp said.

However, the applicant is not the Janiec family but Traditions, which entered into an agreement of sale with the Janiec family in October 2007 to purchase the parcel.

Early in the proceedings, the township solicitor and Traditions attorney John Jaros wrangled with HOA President Tom Rath about whether Supervisor Dr. Robert White should recuse himself from voting on the matter.

Rath sought to demonstrate from statements White made in the past that White is predisposed to approve the development.

Rath cited statements that White had made that he had worked with the developer to change the zoning to allow a higher density use than the original zoning.

Camp said it's not unusual for a developer to come before the board with a plan.

"A lot of details get discussed before they amend the zoning. There is nothing wrong with that," Camp said.

"We're not saying he did anything wrong, but it indicates he is predisposed to approving the application," said Rath.

The parcel next to the Goshen Fire Company was originally zoned R-1 and would have only allowed about 12 homes to be built. The township changed the zoning for the parcel, although the planning commission was against it, to R-3, which allows independent living facilities on parcels of at least five acres.

White said he would not recuse himself. He said he appeared before the planning commission and spoke in favor of the project, but the applicant still had to present a plan to the supervisors that would work.

"The original proposal didn't work and they revised it," said White, referring to the first proposal, which was for 128 units in a building 45 feet high.

The chief argument put forth by Rath is that the proposed use of the property, the 114-unit senior living facility that shares the driveway with the Goshen Fire Company, will be detrimental to the public health, safety and welfare of residents.

Rath sought to introduce exhibits including documents from East Goshen and West Goshen files that discussed traffic issues with the Boot Road corridor.

Jaros objected to them being accepted into the record because the individuals who wrote the documents were not available to be questioned.

Camp said, "the applicant has to prove the objective criteria of the use and the board has to approve it unless the protesting parties can prove that this senior living facility would create more of a harmful impact than another senior living facility."

In other words, it is the applicant's burden to prove that his facility meets the criteria of the zoning ordinance. The board of supervisors has to approve it unless those who are against the facility can prove by expert testimony that this particular senior living facility would be more harmful than another.

At one point, Rath asked if the record could be kept open because state Rep. Barbara McIlvaine Smith, D-156th, of West Chester, was planning to write a second letter to the board.

"I disagree even though she is our state representative, she does not have any jurisdiction in this matter," said White.

At another point in the hearing, White made the statement that Station 56 averages 300 fire calls a year and 700 ambulance calls a year.

John Hosey, a volunteer firefighter who was appointed to represent the fire company in the Traditions matter, said in a telephone call Thursday that Station 56 responds to 400 to 500 fire calls a year and 1,000 to 1,500 ambulance calls a year.

Robert Phiel, a volunteer firefighter who attended the hearing Wednesday, said the station had seven calls Tuesday. There were three vehicle crashes which led to a rash of electrical fires and then two more accidents.

To contact staff writer Anne Pickering, send an e-mail to apickering@dailylocal.com.


Source

SamanthaE wrote on Apr 9, 2010 11:53 AM:

"Good Grief.. ANOTHER Traditions community!? The ones in Kennett Square are bad enough, and we're not even conjested [sic] with as much traffic or highways out here as Goshen is. Those communities went up and automatically everybody in the area had to leave their houses 30 minutes early because of the traffic! If this goes through, say hello to poorly crafted Monopoly-style houses, and ignorance. "


Residents opposing Traditions present petition to township

April 09, 2010
By ANNE PICKERING, Staff Writer

WEST GOSHEN — Opponents of the Traditions senior living facility being proposed to be built next to the Goshen Fire Company on Boot Road plan to present a petition to the township with 675 signatures of residents from six townships who are opposed to it.

“The people who signed the petition uniformly agree that this development is not a good idea because of its proximity to the Goshen Fire Company. They believe it will harm the fire company’s ability to operate,” said Tom Rath, a member of the Greenhill Homeowners Association, in an interview Thursday.

The HOA represents residents from 27 homes on Culbertson Circle and Eastwick Circle who are adjacent to the proposed development, which is in West Goshen just over the township line.

Residents from Willistown, Westtown, East and West Goshen, and East and West Whiteland signed the petition.

The Goshen Fire Company provides emergency services to Willistown, Westtown, East and West Goshen, and as a backup to East Whiteland and West Whiteland townships.

The petition will be presented to the Board of Supervisors April 14 as part of the conditional-use hearing for the proposed development.

The HOA will also present its evidence in what will probably be the last day of the hearing. The board could render a decision immediately or at a future date. The board has 45 days to make a decision.

Traditions specializes in independent living facilities for seniors and has three other Traditions communities in Pennsylvania in Hanover, Hershey and Harleysville. The proposed Traditions on Boot Road will be for 114 residents and will share the driveways with the Goshen Fire Company.

Traditions entered into an agreement of sale in October 2007 with members of the Janiec family. They own the 6.6-acre parcel behind the Goshen Fire Company on Boot Road between the fire company and the Route 202 northbound access ramp.

The state Department of Transportation will not allow another driveway to be built between Greenhill Road and the Route 202 access ramp. There is currently one driveway on the Boot Road side that is on the Janiec land but the Goshen Fire Company has an easement.

Access to the Traditions site will be through the two fire company driveways, one on Greenhill Road and one on Boot Road.

Goshen Fire Company officials said they officially oppose the project but did agree to a set of conditions proposed by the developer.

East Goshen, another party to the hearing, also said it was officially opposed to the project but conceded the property owner had a right to develop and access his property.

The property was originally zoned R-1 residential which would have allowed about 12 homes to be built.

John Jaros, the attorney for Traditions, said the developer contacted the township in April 2008 about a senior living facility.

The township revised the zoning to R-3 which allows independent living facilities on parcels of at least five acres with approval of the board of supervisors through a conditional-use hearing.

Supervisor Dr. Robert White said during the Dec. 2 hearing on the development that he had worked with Traditions on the revised zoning.

The West Goshen Planning Commission, however, did not approve the zoning change. The developer scaled the project back from a 45-foot-tall, 128-unit development to a 35-foot-tall, 114-unit building and re-submitted the proposal to the planning commission. The planning commission rejected it again. The commission is only a recommending body.

During the conditional-use hearing, which has been under way in the township since the summer, Jaros negotiated a set of 28 conditions with the Goshen Fire Company and East Goshen. Some of the conditions include constructing additional parking for the fire company, adding another turning lane on Greenhill Road and improving stormwater management facilities.

Rath said that the purpose of the petition was to show the fire company that the larger community supports its opposition to the project.

“We also wanted to show the Board of Supervisors that if they choose to approve this, that the community will be very unhappy. We want Traditions to be a good corporate citizen and choose a different location,” said Rath.

To contact staff writer Anne Pickering, send an e-mail to apickering@dailylocal.com.


Source

Citizen petition against Traditions project gets 675 signatures

April 08, 2010

WEST GOSHEN -- Opponents of the Traditions senior living facility being proposed to be built next to the Goshen Fire Company on Boot Road plan to present a petition to the township with 675 signatures of residents from six townships who are opposed to it.

”The people who signed the petition uniformly agree that this development is not a good idea because of its proximity to the Goshen Fire Company. They believe it will harm the fire company‘s ability to operate,“ said Tom Rath, a member of the Greenhill Homeowners Association, in an interview Thursday.


Source

Proposed senior facility testimony continues

February 18, 2010
By ANNE PICKERING, Staff Writer

WEST GOSHEN — The attorney for a developer who wants to build a controversial senior citizen facility next to the Goshen Fire Company wrapped up his testimony before township officials Wednesday.

The proposed 114-unit facility to be built on a 6.6-acre parcel on Boot Road between Greenhill Road and the Route 202 northbound access ramp has created fears that the fire company's operations may be affected with the addition of more traffic on its driveways and at the intersection. The senior facility would share the fire company's driveways.

The fire company has two driveways that access its property from Boot Road and Greenhill Road. The state Department of Transportation will not allow any more driveways on Boot Road between Greenhill and the Route 202 access ramp or on the Greenhill Road side. As a result, the proposed senior citizen home has to share the fire company's driveways.

The conditional-use hearing before the supervisors has been going on for a number of months.

On Wednesday, while the developer's attorney concluded his testimony, the Greenhill Homeowners Association asked that the hearing be kept open to give it the opportunity to present evidence. The hearing was continued until April 13.

At that date, after the homeowners' association presents testimony, the hearing could be closed but the supervisors may not render a decision. The board has 45 days to make a decision.

John Jaros, the attorney for the developer, Traditions Development Corp., submitted a list of 28 self-imposed conditions for the development that were negotiated with East Goshen Township and the Goshen Fire Company.

East Goshen is involved because the project is on its border and residents of Culbertson Circle who are in the Greenhill Road Homeowners' Association have asked the township to be involved.

Both East Goshen, through its attorney, Ross Unruh, and the fire company made statements that they were not in favor of the project but had worked with the developer in writing the conditions.

"We do feel, however, that a project of this scale, with this use and at this location, will have possible adverse impacts that the conditions cannot address. We formally oppose the application, but we fully support the adoption of the conditions if the application is approved," John Hosey, a volunteer firefighter representing the Goshen Fire Company's board, told the supervisors.

Unruh said that "while the East Goshen Board of Directors do not believe that this use is in keeping with the adjoining residential uses and it may impact the operations of Goshen Fire Company, they concede that this applicant has a right to develop and access his property."

Some of the conditions address various concerns that have been voiced by residents and the fire company.

For instance, the developer agrees to construct additional parking for the fire company on the fire company's property and to contribute funds for future retaining wall repairs. Many of the revisons have to do with improving stormwater management on the site. Another condition relates to keeping large trees in a 40-foot buffer between the proposed development and the homeowners on Culbertson Drive.

About 15 members of the fire company attended the hearing as well as two East Goshen supervisors and the township manager.

Mary Doherty, an area resident, said she had concerns about school bus stops on Greenhill Road and the impact of traffic backing up behind the buses.

The developer plans to widen Greenhill Road in order to construct a right-hand turning lane for westbound traffic at the intersection of Greenhill and Boot Road.

Another condition addresses area residents' concerns that there isn't enough parking on site for the facility. The developer has agreed to set aside land on the site for additional parking if the need arises.

To contact staff writer Anne Pickering, send an e-mail to apickering@dailylocal.com.

Source

West Goshen Township
Board of Supervisors
February 17, 2010
4:00 PM
Agenda

1. The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.

2. Announcement by Chief Michael Carroll.

3. Reports for the month of January 2010:

A) Police Reports presented by Chief Michael Carroll.
B) Fire Marshal's Report including Goshen Fire Company and Good Fellowship Ambulance Company presented by Fire Marshal Andrea Testa.
C) Building Official's Report presented by Building Official John Beswick.

4. Open the floor for public comment.

5. Board of Supervisors announcements.

6. Township Manager's announcements.

7. Approval of the Board of Supervisors minutes of January 20, 2010.

8. Approval of Treasurer's Reports dated January 31, 2010, for the General Fund, the Sewer Revenue Fund, the Waste and Recycling Fund, and the Capital Reserve Fund, and the bills to be paid from these funds.

9. Consideration and possible approval of the Decision and Order for the Conditional Use application for CIRR, LLC. The hearing on this application was closed on December 21, 2009.

10. Possible awarding of bids for the construction of the new public works garage. Bids were publicly opened and read on January 19, 2010 at 3:00 p.m.

11. Any other business to come before the Board.

Adjourn

Supervisors Hearing S-08-09

Consideration and possible approval of a conditional use application for Traditions Development Corp. who seeks conditional use approval pursuant to Section 84-12.G(3) of the West Goshen Township Zoning Ordinance to construct a 114 unit senior apartment building or independent living facility on property situated at the northeast corner of Boot Road and Route 202 located in the R-3 Residential District.

Source

Fire company denies having Traditions agreement

January 31, 2010
By ANNE PICKERING

WEST GOSHEN -- Goshen Fire Company officials have written a letter to the Board of Supervisors in an effort to dispell rumors that it has reached an agreement with the Traditions developer.

"It has come to our attention that the West Goshen Board of Supervisors believes the Fire Company reached a full agreement with Traditions some time last year and has since been in full support of this project," the letter says.

"Unfortunately, this perception has already marred the public's opinion of the Fire Company, but we do not want this or any other misinformation to unduly influence the Board of Supervisors' decision in the upcoming conditional-use hearing."

Traditions, a developer of senior housing facilities, wants to build a new 114-unit development on the corner of Boot and Greenhill roads next to the Goshen Fire Company. Because the state Department of Transportation won't allow another driveway on the section of Boot Road between Greenhill and the Route 202 northbound ramp, the senior facility has to share driveways with the Goshen Fire Company.

The developer has presented details of the planned development with expert testimony to the Board of Supervisors during a conditional-use hearing that has lasted several months.

At the last meeting Jan. 20, it looked as though the supervisors were going to vote on the application, but the attorney for Traditions asked to continue the hearing.

John Jaros, an attorney for Traditions Development Corp., said they were still trying to work out conditions for the project that would be acceptable to the fire company.

John Hosey wrote the letter, which was also disseminated to the homeowners' associations of the Greenhill Road residents and Yardley Village.

Hosey is a volunteer firefighter who was appointed to the project by the fire company's board because he has a background in real estate.

While not a proponent of this project, Hosey said in the letter that in an effort to promote safety for everyone concerned, the fire company has a set of conditions.

"If the project goes through without these conditions, Station 56's existing utility will be irreversibly diminished to the detriment of West Goshen and the many other communities it serves," Hosey said in the letter.

Some of the conditions Jaros addressed at the last meeting included adding internal barriers or warning lights so that when the fire company is responding to an emergency, residents of Traditions will not use the driveways. Other conditions are to improve traffic flow at the Boot and Greenhill road intersection by adding a third turning lane on Greenhill.

The fire company also needs more parking. Currently, it has 22 spaces. Frequently, there are overlapping events such as a large training event and a fundraiser. Extra parking is available now on unmarked spots behind the building. Once construction starts, the fire company will lose those spots as well as some of their dedicated spaces.

They are proposing a re-design of the parking area for the fire company to create more on-site parking for the fire company.

While the developer modified his original plan by reducing the height of the building and reducing the number of units, "negative elements remain that no revisions can correct," Hosey said in the letter.

One element is the basic fact that there are only two driveways and the fire company will have to share them with the Traditions' residents. The other element is what is now two lanes of traffic on Boot Road going eastward, could end up being one lane of through traffic. Motorists turning left from Boot Road to enter Traditions will occupy the second lane. Traffic could back up behind them as they wait to cross two lanes of traffic to enter the facility.

The next meeting for the conditional-use hearing is Feb. 10.

To contact staff writer Anne Pickering, send an e-mail to apickering@dailylocal.com.

Source

Commission votes down Traditions again

January 22, 2010
By ANNE PICKERING, Staff Writer

WEST GOSHEN — The conditional-use hearing for Traditions, a 114-unit senior living facility proposed for Boot Road next to the Goshen Fire Company, resumed Wednesday with testimony from an engineer and traffic consultant hired by the developer.

The township planning commission voted the controversial project down for a third time at its meeting Tuesday.

In December, the developer announced a revised plan to reduce the height of the facility from 45 feet to 35 feet and reduce the number of units from 128 to 114.

The revised plan was brought back before the planning commission, which rejected it again. The planning commission is only a recommending body. The board of supervisors makes the ultimate decision.

The project has been controversial because the 114 or more senior citizens who would be living at the proposed facility will share their driveway with the Goshen Fire Company. This has raised fears that the traffic from residents going to and fro will affect first responders who are trying to get to the station to respond to emergencies.

About 45 people attended the conditional-use hearing Wednesday.

Traffic is the biggest complaint from people who live in the area. Boot Road is clogged with commuters at rush hour either getting on Route 202 or getting off to go to the many business parks in the area.

The proposed facility will be sandwiched between the Route 202 northbound ramp and the West Goshen Fire Company on the corner of Boot and Greenhill roads

Traffic consultant Mark Allen, hired by Traditions Development Corp., said the facility would generate about 18 trips in the morning and 11 trips in the evening — a drop in the bucket compared to the 2,900 vehicles that pass through the Boot and Greenhill roads intersection every hour during rush hour.

Traditions specializes in independent living facilities for seniors and has three other Traditions communities in Pennsylvania in Hanover, Hershey and Harleysville.
"These type of facilities typically generate much less traffic than single-family residences," said Allen.

Average daily trips for this type of facility is about 396 trips.

In reviewing traffic in the area, Allen, looked at four intersections: the Route 202 northbound ramp; the Route 202 southbound ramp; Boot and Greenhill roads and Boot Road and Wilson Drive.

Allen said the study indicated the current level of service at the Boot and Greenhill roads intersection is D in the morning rush hour and C in the afternoon rush hour. Level of service refers to how long motorists have to wait to get through an intersection. With A level of service, it would take the motorist 10 seconds. If it takes two minutes that would be the equivalent of an F level of service at these intersections."

"Whether Traditions gets built or doesn't," Allen said, "will not affect the level of service."

The developer is proposing some traffic changes including adding a third lane to Greenhill Road between Boot Road and Culbertson Drive.

Following the presentations by the traffic consultant and engineer, the supervisors were ready to vote on whether to approve the project but John Jaros, the attorney for Traditions, asked to postpone the vote until the next meeting. He said he is working with East Goshen Township and representatives of the Goshen Fire Company to resolve some of the issues.

Ross Unruh, East Goshen's attorney, said in an interview Thursday that he still had a list of things that the township wants the developer to do relating to stormwater management and traffic.

"So far they have been very agreeable, but the devil is in the details," said Unruh.

If an agreement is not reached, Unruh said, he would present expert testimony at the next hearing, which is Feb. 10.

To contact staff writer Anne Pickering, send an e-mail to apickering@dailylocal.com.

Source

WEST GOSHEN TOWNSHIP PLANNING COMMISSION
January 19, 2010
At 7:00 PM
AGENDA


1. The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.

2. Open the floor for public comment.

3. Approval of the minutes from the December 15, 2009 meeting.

4. Initial Submissions A. Land Development Plan for a 2,370 square foot building addition for Cephalon, Inc. located at 201 Brandywine Parkway.

5. Discussion of a Conditional Use application from Traditions Development Corporation for construction of a 114 unit Senior Apartment Building or Independent Living Facility located at the northeast corner of Boot Road and SR 0202.

6. Committee Reports.

7. Open the floor for public comment.

8. Adjourn

Check the document archives (link) for the handouts!

Source

Letters sent to East Goshen residents:

July 29, 2009

Dear Property Owner:

The purpose of this letter is to inform you that East Goshen Township has been notified that West Goshen Township has received a conditional use application for a 128 unit senior apartment building which is proposed to be developed on the parcel next to the Goshen Fire Station on Boot road and Greenhill Road.

The West Goshen Township meetings for this application are:
August 17, 2009 (7 pm) - Planning Commission (Make a Recommendation to ~ the Board of Supervisors)
August 19, 2009 (4 pm) - Board of Supervisors (Conditional Use Hearing)

Pursuant to East Goshen Township policy, property owners and residents within 1000 feet of the subject property are informed of these applications. I have provided the public advertisement on the back of this letter for your information. For more information contact West Goshen Township 610-696- 5266.

Sincerely,

Mark A. Gordon
Township Zoning Officer

Cc: All East Goshen Township Authorities, Boards and Commissions
Casey LaLonde, Township Manager, West Goshen Township

NOTICE IS GIVEN that the Board of Supervisors of West Goshen Township will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, August 19, 2009, immediately following the public meeting which commences at 4:00 p.m., prevailing time, at the West Goshen Township Municipal. Building, 1025 Paoli Pike, West Chester, PA 19380, to consider the conditional use application filed by Traditions Development Corp. (applicants) take testimony and, if appropriate, render a decision. Applicant seeks conditional use approval pursuant to Section 84-12.G(3) of the West Goshen Township Zoning Ordinance to construct a 128 unit apartment building or independent living facility on property situate northeast corner of Boot Road and Route 202, which property is more particularly identified as Chester County tax parcel No. 52-3-60, located in the R-3 Residential District.

The complete conditional use application and plans are available for public inspection and may be examined without charge or obtained for a charge not greater than the cost thereof at the Township's administrative Offices, located at 1025 Paoli Pike, West Chester, PA 19380, during normal business hours, 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and at the offices of the Township Solicitor, 118 West Market Street, Suite 300, West Chester, PA 19382, from 9:00 am. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

If any person who wishes to attend the hearing has a disability and/or requires an auxiliary aid, service or other accommodation to observe or participate in the hearing, he or she should contact the Township Building at (610) 696-5266 to discuss how those needs may be accommodated.

Sandra K. Turley, Secretary

West Goshen Township

Please publish twice:

August 4, 2009 and August 11, 2009

Photos

Location of apartment building
Did you see the township notice? Roll over the pictures if you haven't seen them. Or click to enlarge each image.
Township Notices - Township Notices

Daily Local News articles

(link)

August 25th, 2009
By ANNE PICKERING, Staff Writer

WEST GOSHEN — A developer wants to put a building with 128 apartments for seniors on 6.6 acres off Boot and Greenhill roads between the Goshen Fire Company and a Route 202 access ramp.

The proposed high-density development has raised concerns from neighbors, who say they already have difficulty getting out of their driveways because of heavy traffic on Boot Road. Employees from various corporate parks, including the QVC Studio Park, access Route 202 from Boot Road.

The project also could trouble emergency responders from Goshen Fire Company at the corner of Boot and Greenhill roads because the fire company's two driveways would also be access roads for the new development.

"It's a horrible plan. There's a slew of new development coming to the area which already has severe traffic problems," said Tom Casey, who lives off Boot Road and Windsor Drive.

Casey and others along Boot Road, including Ss. Peter and Paul Catholic Church and School, opposed a joint East and West Goshen plan to widen Boot Road. That plan was shelved in June, although there are plans to improve the timing of traffic lights at Greenhill and the Route 202 access ramps.

The concept plan for the 55-plus independent living facility describes a three-story, 30,000-square-foot building with 103 parking spaces. Traditions Development Corp. presented the plan to township supervisors Wednesday during a conditional-use hearing.

West Goshen zoning officer Raymond McKeeman said Monday that the property's owner approached township officials a few years ago to discuss what he could build on the land.

Because his parcel fronts both Boot Road and the Route 202 access ramp, officials estimated he would only be allowed to build about 12 homes there.

At the time, the township's zoning code did not specifically allow independent living facilities, although nursing homes were allowed in the commercial district. Township officials wanted to revise the code to allow independent living facilities, which were being built throughout the county.

In December, township supervisors agreed to revise the R-3 Residential District to allow independent living facilities with a minimum lot size of five acres by conditional use.

Issues regarding how the proposed building would affect the Goshen Fire Company's operations were raised at a July 21 West Goshen Planning Commission meeting, when fire company officials raised concerns about sharing their driveways with residents of the new development.

When the parcel was subdivided by the original owner to allow the fire company to build its station, two easements were given to the owner so that the remaining parcel, which is now the proposed Traditions complex, would not be landlocked. One easement was behind the fire department where there is parking and access to Greenhill Road, and the other was the driveway onto Boot Road.

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation would not allow the Traditions facility to have its own access onto Boot Road because it is too close to the Route 202 access ramp.

Goshen Fire Company volunteer John Hose told the planning commission that building the new facility would cause "stormwater runoff problems, affect their parking, cause access problems for their call responders and their emergency vehicle routes as well as limit their ability to fully utilize their own site."

Kevin Carney, another volunteer with the company, said parking at the site was inadequate.

John Jaros, an attorney representing Traditions, said he would meet with fire company and township personnel to discuss the problems.

In addition to this proposed development, Greenhill Corporate Park has a plan before the township to build a 2½-story, 34,480-square-foot office building with 109 parking spaces. The unit 11 building is the last vacant lot at the corporate park at 1171 McDermott Drive.

Casey said the township continues to approve large developments even with all the concern about traffic in the Boot Road/Route 202 corridor.

The township supervisors' "vision for West Goshen is corporate-driven, and that's unfortunate for the residents," Casey said.

To contact staff writer Anne Pickering, send an e-mail to apickering@dailylocal.com.

(link)

December 2nd, 2009
By ANNE PICKERING, Staff Writer

WEST GOSHEN — The size of the controversial new senior living facility proposed for Boot Road next to the Goshen Fire Company has been scaled back from 128 units to 114 units and reduced 10 feet in height in response to complaints from the neighbors.

John Jaros, the attorney for the developer, Traditions Development Corp., told the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday that the developer was sensitive to the concerns of the neighbors and reworked the design of the building to reduce it from 45 feet to 35 feet.

Joseph "Skip" Brion, the township solicitor, recommended that the developer go back before the planning commission and submit the revised design.

On Oct. 20, the planning commission rejected the former design, saying that the facility was too intense, and too tall for a residential neighborhood. The commission also raised concerns about traffic.

The project has been controversial from the start because the 114 or more senior citizens living at the proposed facility will be sharing driveways with the Goshen Fire Company. This has raised fears that the additional traffic could hamper first responders trying to get to the fire station and then respond to the emergency.

About 60 people attended the conditional-use hearing and many were from Culbertson Circle, the street that directly abuts the proposed development.

About seven property owners from adjacent properties, the Goshen Fire Company, East Goshen Township and the Greenhill Home Owners Association were granted party status for the proceeding.

Having party status means that they can legally appeal any decision by the Board of Supervisors.

Mike McCormack, the president of Traditions Development Corp., said the company has an agreement of sale for the 6.6-acre lot with a number of members of the Janiec family.

Traditions specializes in independent living facilities for senior citizens and has three other Traditions communities in Pennsylvania in Hanover, Hershey and Harleysville.

Residents rent studio, one-bedroom or two-bedroom units that include two meals a day and other amenities such as a fitness studio, movie theater, housekeeping services, and emergency aid.

There are no entry fees and prices range from $1,900 a month to $2,700 a month. The facility is not designed for assisted living or skilled nursing.

Ross Unruh, East Goshen's special counsel, asked how many staff members would be at the facility. McCormack said there would be about 12 staff members during the day. East Goshen is a party because Traditions is on the border with East Goshen.

Robert Adams, the attorney for the Goshen Fire Company, asked what the average age of residents was. McCormack said they were in their early 80s.

Several people from Culbertson Circle questioned when Traditions first got involved with the township.

Jaros said the company entered into an agreement of sale with the Janiec family in October 2007 but didn't contact the township until April 2008. The parcel is in the R-3 residential zoning district that originally didn't allow independent living facilities. But the zoning was changed to allow independent living facilities by conditional use on a minimum lot size of five acres. That zoning change was not approved by the West Goshen Planning Commission.

Since the planning commission didn't write the revised ordinance, Keith Dickerson, a resident of Culbertson Circle asked Jaros who did.

Dr. Robert White, a township supervisor, said he worked with Traditions to revise the zoning.

Questions regarding traffic were deferred to the next hearing, when the traffic consultant will testify.

The Participants:

TRADITIONS DEVELOPMENT CORP. Traditions Development Corp. includes the principals of Preferred Development, which specializes in the development of senior residential housing, and Heritage Senior Living, LLC, a property management firm specializing in the senior living industry. Preferred Development draws upon more ten years of industry of experience to assist numerous private developers and owners to start successful projects. The company has developed 40 senior care buildings in nine states with a total project cost of over $350 million. Heritage Senior Living currently manages ten facilities in Pennsylvania and Virginia. Heritage recruits and trains the staff for each facility and provides ongoing management of day-to-day operations. This includes marketing, financial management and regulatory compliance. Heritage also provides consultation on facility design and development.

AMC DELANCEY GROUP, INC. Founded by Kenneth P. Balin in 1992, AMC Delancey Group, Inc. is a leading real estate investment and development firm that aligns interests and co-invests with a growing number of real estate operating partners throughout the United States. Headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Company's programmatic approach focuses first on the quality of potential operating partners, next on their investment strategies, and then on the specific properties proposed for acquisition. The Company's current investment programs include hotel, office, retail, multi-family, condominium, mixed use, and land development. AMC Delancey plans to expand these and future investment programs throughout the United States, with both existing and new operating partners, with investments targeted over the next several years in excess of one billion dollars. For more information on AMC Delancey Group, visit www.amcdelancey.com .
Source

October 20, 2009:

Conditional Use:

Applicant: Traditions Development Corp.

Location: North east corner of Boot Road & Route 202

Represented by: John Jaros, Esquire

Mike McCormick, and John Murphy

Mr. Murphy began by giving an overview of the proposed project, consisting of a 128-unit Independent Living Facility. The property is situated next to the Goshen Fire Company lot, and abuts the Hershey Mill community in East Goshen Township. A shared access exists with the Goshen Fire Company. Mr. Murphy explained that the Traditions Development Corporation has held numerous meetings with PennDot, East Goshen Township, the Hershey Mill Homeowners Association, and the Goshen Fire Company in order to resolve issues which have arisen with abutting property owners. Talks with PennDot are ongoing to discuss possible modifications to the existing driveways in order to accommodate both uses. The applicant proposes to maintain as much of the existing landscape which now buffers the Hershey Mill Community as possible, while adding a minimum 3 foot high berm and fencing. In regard to parking, he stated they have exceeded the requirements per the Township code as well as what they feel is necessary for the use. Based on criteria gathered at their 114-unit, Hanover site, there were 35 vehicles in the parking lot during peak times, which meant that 30% of the occupied units have their own car. A van provides transportation to the bulk of the residents and is available every 20-30 minutes. Monica Drewniany stated that while she believed the use was necessary, she felt the proposed project was too dense for this site. Jeffrey Laudenslager had concerns over the height of the building. Jeffrey Lieberman questioned whether or not existing resources for emergency response would be stretched with an apartment complex next door. Several residents from East Goshen Township were present to comment on the plan. Tom Rupp, the President of the Hershey Mill Homeowners' Association, had concerns over the stormwater run off. Jim Stark, of Quaker Ridge Village in Hershey Mills, questioned the co-mingling of two uses on a lot. Tom Day, of Yardley Village in Hershey Mill, and Walker Thompkins, of Hamlet Hill, expressed concern over the traffic issues which could result from this use. Al Zaccarelli, felt the plan provided insufficient parking, especially if more residents choose to drive their own vehicles. He mimicked Mr. Rupp's concerns in regard to stormwater runoff, and urged the members of the West Goshen Township Planning Commission to seriously consider all elements of the proposed plan. Stephen Janiec, the property owner of the lot under discussion, responded to all by clarifying that the Fire Company originally purchased the land at a reduced rate, with full knowledge of the access challenges on the property. At the time of purchase, a 70,000 square foot office building was proposed which would have had shared access with the Fire Company. The West Goshen supervisors denied the office use. There being no more discussion, a motion was made by Monica Drewniany and seconded by Jim O'Brien to recommend that the Board of Supervisors deny the conditional use request. Motion carried unanimously (8:0).
Source

Links

AMC Delancy (Funding for Traditions)

AMC Delancy-news releases

Traditions to build along 202

Traditions search on Google

Traditions Development in the Daily Local News

West Goshen Township website

West Goshen Township meeting agenda page

West Goshen Township request for public records

West Goshen Township newsletter

West Goshen Township Board of Supervisors minutes

West Goshen Township Planning Commission minutes

East Goshen Township Planning Commission minutes (pdf) (archive copy)

Yardley Village (Hershey's Mill)

Yardley Villiage Newsletter (word document) (archive copy)

Tom Casey: "This is a republic not a democracy, we don't have to listen to you people", that is a direct quote from Dr. White at the last supervisors meeting."


East Boot Road Widening Proposal

West Goshen Township wants to widen Boot Road between Wilson Drive and Greenhill Road. This will increase road use, and the loss of the shoulders will create a serious safety hazard for Boot Road residents. We believe this isn't the best fix, and many more cost-effective solutions are available.

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If you live on... - Announcements - Comments, concerns - See it from the sky - Document archive - Local links

If you live on:

  • Windsor Drive
  • Greenhill Road
  • Nottingham Drive
  • Nottingham Circle
  • Airport Road
  • Wooded Way
  • Evan Court
  • Jaclyn Drive
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  • Amalfi Drive
  • Or attend Saints Peter & Paul Catholic Church and School

    These changes affect you!

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    Document Archive

    Initial notice from McCormick-Taylor (link to pdf file) (87kB)

    Meeting Agenda — 30 April 2009 (link to pdf file) (41kB)

    Highway Permit Plans — (link to pdf file) (1.1 MB)

    Meeting notice from West Goshen Township — (link to pdf file) (73kB)

    E Goshen minutes from May 26th meeting — (link to pdf file) (850 kB)

    E Goshen Treasurers report — (link to pdf file) (955 kB)

    Daily Local News article May 18th, 2009 — (link to pdf file) (1500 kB)

    Presentation from Leo Sinclair at East Goshen meeting on June 2 — (link to pdf file) (5.5 MB)

    Document archive from West Goshen Township (large) (link to page)

    Links

    (some may be outdated)

    McCormick Taylor

    West Goshen Township — (admin list)

    East Goshen Township — (admin list)

    West Chester Area School District

    Barbara McIvaine-Smith

    Andrew Dinniman

    Krapf Transportation (School Bus contractor)

    Saints Peter & Paul Catholic Church and School

    Hershey's Mill - realtor

    All Daily Local News articles on "Boot Road".

    DLN articles on "East Boot Road"


    East Boot Road Widening Proposal Tradition Links Conditional Use-Traditions Development Corp-October 20, 2009
    The Participants DLN - December 2, 2009 DLN - August 25, 2009
    Township application mini postings Hearing notice-August 11, 2009 EG notice to EG residents-July 29, 2009
    WG Planning Commission Meeting-January 19, 2010 DLN - Traditions shot down again-January 22, 2010 Fire company denies having Traditions agreement-January 31, 2010
    WG BOS Meeting Feb 17, 2010 Proposed senior facility testimony continues-February 18, 2010 Petition against Traditions gets 675 signatures-April 08, 2010
    Residents...present petition to township-April 09, 2010 SamanthaE wrote on Apr 9, 2010 11:53 AM: Testimony ends in hearing for planned senior living facility-April 16, 2010
    Traditions gets conditional use approval-May 12, 2010 Traditions plan moves forward-May 13, 2010 2 more supervisors for West Goshen isn't such a bad idea-June 23, 2010
    Phil Corvo Reports Success!-July 25, 2010 West Goshen not happy with the petition-August 2, 2010 Resident challenges petition signatures-August 13, 2010
    Judge strikes down challenge to petition-August 19, 2010 West Goshen Republicans support ballot referendum-September 15, 2010 West Goshen approves supervisor referendum-November 03, 2010
    Green Hill HOA -- Land Use Appeal-April 07, 2012

    “It is often easier to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission.” — Grace Hopper

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